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Rein the Reigning Rain

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The first light of Monday had long appeared when the fluffy white substance, which called the sky home, started to darken. The three siblings were lying in the garden with only the sky as their roof, completely aware of the power struggle between the blue and the grey, yet, they refused to move.

Feobre, the eldest, was the wisest and the most adamant among them. She was the first to propose their stillness. Dunrig, the middle, who liked to think of himself as courageous though he couldn’t possibly prove its truth, agreed to Feobre’s proposal because he wanted to challenge the mighty rain. Refta, the youngest, was simply too lazy to think or move.

When the rain finally fell, Refta’s mind was kindled by the raindrops that bumped into her snout. She got up on all four, looked up, and opened her mouth as wide as she could. She sighed loudly, thanking the drops that willingly touched her pinkish tongue. Then, she looked at her brother and sister, staring at them with eyes full of hope.

“Whatever you have on your mind,” Feobre said, “you can spill them all to us.”

A bit hesitant at first, Refta mustered her courage before she cried, “The sky is sharing its happiness. Happiness is the rain. Now, I am happiness!”

“That’s not right, Refta. You should’ve said ‘I am happy!’ You still have much to learn,” Dunrig responded. “Besides, the sky is not happy right now. It’s angry.”

“No, no, no! Brother, I AM happiness!” she barked once more. “Ah, I want to join the drops of water in their party as they skydive from the firmament!”

“Well said, sister! Who taught to speak like that?” Feobre stood on her front legs to get a better look at her cute little sister.

“Father taught me! Hehe…”

“What are you so proud of? It doesn’t matter how good the diction is, if the statement is wrong, it’s worthless.” Dunrig was now standing like Refta. He might be older, but his legs were a bit shorter than her little sister. “The sky is angry, not happy. Don’t you hear its thundering roars?” Dunrig felt like a hero because he could withstand the wrath of the heavens.

“But I’m happiness!” Refta said cheerfully as if her brother just said nothing.

“Okay, okay, Sister. My cute little sister!” Feobre trotted towards Refta. She kissed her on the forehead and stroked her on the neck with her own.

Feeling ignored, Dunrig asked, “Feobre, what do you say? Is the sky angry or happy?”

“Brother, I don’t want to disappoint you, but I don’t think the sky is angry. But it’s not happy either. I would say—”

“I am happy!” Refta screamed as she chased her own tail for no reason at all. “I would say it’s sad.”

“Sad? That doesn’t make any sense. The sky is mad, it’s screaming non-stop, and it’s trying to destroy everything under it by throwing all of its weapons downwards.”

“Weapons? Brother, the raindrops can’t possibly cause any harm, not even to the weakest.”

“I believe that’s not the case. But we are just too strong. I’ve seen what it can do. Together, the raindrops can cause trouble even to our father and mother. Even mother! But not us. We rein the reigning rain.”

“We do not rein anything, Brother. It’s not trying to reign over us anyway. Right, Refta?”

“It makes me happy!” she shouted from a distance as she merrily ran to and fro, trying to catch as many raindrops as she could.

“Hmm… Then, explain why you think it’s sad,” the only male in the pack demanded.

“The roars… indeed sound mad at first. But if you give it a decent amount of your attention, you’ll realise that it’s not out of rage, but out of despair. Don’t you think the sky is miserable? It stands up there all alone, at all times, has nothing to fight for, nothing to live for, nothing to die for. Just exist for no reason at all. The clouds are its eyes, and the raindrops are its tears, for it’s the only way to get rid of the great anguish. Here we are, exposing ourselves to its tears! I wish the great sky would feel less lonely if we don’t run away. I wish that by accompanying it when it’s sad, we could ease its burden a bit. I wish it could learn from your courage, and be entertained by Refta’s joyful attitude.”

Feobre’s speech left Dunrig in silent wonderment. The two once again lay down on their stomach. The rain had soaked their fur and tails, but they cared not. They had nothing on their minds as they enjoyed the tapping of the rain on their tiny foreheads. Refta, who was now tired of running, returned to her beloved siblings. She jumped and landed her small body on her brother’s back. Dunrig didn’t move a muscle as if her little sister just did nothing. The three siblings insisted on their stillness even when their mother called when the rain became heavy.

“Oh sky, don’t be sad! Don’t be mad!” whispered Refta calmly. “Look! Look at me! I am happiness!”

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